IC HUB

UK brands ‘lag behind US customer experience – due to employee engagement’

June 13, 2017

A lack of employee engagement is the main reason why UK firms struggle to compete with US businesses on customer experience, new research claims.

British organisations lag behind American firms on customer experience ratings, according to latest findings from workplace culture specialists KPMG Nunwood.

And experts believe the UK’s inability to get to grips with understanding how to engage employees is a decisive factor.

David Conway, senior partner and chief strategy officer at KPMG Nunwood, told Marketing Week: “US brands are very focused on how employees interact with customers, the type of behaviours they use and the service levels they aspire to.

“Their target for a great experience is far higher than companies in the UK.”

The US Customer Experience Excellence report, which was conducted in March, saw 100 US brands score an average of 7.75 out of 10.

The UK equivalent happened in September and saw British companies score an average of 7.33.

Tellingly, 58 US organisations scored more than an eight. Only four UK firms managed the feat.

“At the last count, 30% of Fortune 500 companies have organised themselves around customer needs rather than departments or functions,” said Mr Conway.

“There is a substantial difference in how those companies are going to market and managing the experience delivery.”

He added employee engagement plays a crucial role in this, which is something UK brands “haven’t quite caught hold of.”

Mr Conway points to W Hotels, a new entry in 6th place in the US research, for reaping the benefits from an engaged workforce.

Employee engagement

He added: “It doesn’t call people staff or employees, it calls them talent, and it doesn’t refer to the maid as a housekeeper, she is a stylist.

“It’s got a really interesting set of words it uses that make people think about what they do.

“W is totally focused on delivering a great experience for employees and then encouraging them to behave in the right way for the customer.”

To read the full article, visit Marketing Week here….

“It doesn’t call people staff or employees, it calls them talent, and it doesn’t refer to the maid as a housekeeper, she is a stylist.

“It’s got a really interesting set of words it uses that make people think about what they do."