IC HUB

Email blunders – preventing communication errors

July 31, 2017

‘Email sent’ – two words that we read so much they have become meaningless, but sending an email to the wrong person could result in serious consequences.

Take John White, Founder of Social Marketing Solutions, who lost a “$2 million deal” due to an email that one of his staff accidentally sent out.

White said the client “was often hard to work with” and had sent an email with “some pretty demanding requests.”

A team leader accidentally replied: “The wicked witch of the west is back on her broomstick. Which one of you wants to respond?”

She hit the ‘Reply All’ button without taking out the client. The employee lost her job, the deal; and the company’s reputation was tarnished.

Although it may seem like you’ve written a million emails, it’s important to remember than it only takes a second to press send.

Remember, it’s difficult to interpret the tone of language over email, so here are some tips to consider.

Stay away from ‘Reply All’

Unless absolutely necessary. Does everyone in the thread really want to hear what you’ve got to say? In 2016, an IT contractor sent a test email to every member of staff in the NHS. Respondents crashed the system by using the ‘Reply All’ button – an estimated 186 million pointless emails were sent.

Calm down before you press send

Ever regretted something you said in a rage? Thankfully, you don’t have to reply to emails instantly, so if you receive one that affects you emotionally, wait before you respond. Get away from your desk and calm down. Finally, if you’ve written a response and you’re still in a temper, ask someone to check your email before you hit send.

No gossiping

If you haven’t got anything nice to say, then don’t say anything at all – especially over email. There is no positive that comes from gossiping, and emails can easily stray into the wrong hands.

Try to keep these tips in mind when sending emails within the workplace.

She hit the ‘Reply All’ button without taking out the client. The employee lost her job, the deal; and the company’s reputation was tarnished.